Category: clean water

Protecting Our Water Supply Now More Than Ever

Washington (GGM) Analysis | March 23, 2020
NoreenProfilePicHillReport-75 by Noreen Wise

World Water Day was celebrated across the globe yesterday, Sunday March 22, 2020, and I must confess that I’ve never cared more about clean water than I do right now. In the past month, with coronavirus spreading like wildfire, and the CDC pleading with us to wash our hands for at least 20 seconds, many times a day, my water usage has tripled. When I add in how much more frequently I now do laundry, several times a week Water Drop Earthto scrub off potential coronavirus germs that I don’t want lying around my home, I’m stunned by how often I think of water.

The moment that pushed me over the edge, however, was when I was out searching for bottled water this week. Nearly every store was sold out. I finally had to pick through a few leftover brands that no one else wanted and found myself hyper-analyzing why no one else wanted them. Why were they left behind? Googling to see where the springs were, so many fears flooded my mind. Was it really clean water, or did the bottling company just turn on a lead lined tap in an old rusty warehouse sitting out by a superfund site that recently flooded after being hit by a water bomb, and I was I going to deeply regret this purchase one day?

There’s already enough to worry about with coronavirus, adding clean water to the list is not something that’s easy to process, yet here I am so concerned that I’m transforming into a clean water advocate / activist on top of being a climate activist. The two seem to go hand in hand.

As a United States Citizen, clean water is something I’ve always taken for granted. I don’t like to admit that. There are certainly many US citizens who don’t have clean water and are forced to suffer the consequences, either by purchasing purified water, or drinking toxic water the many potential health consequences. Sadly, there are several habits we adults have gotten into that we don’t necessarily realize contaminate our clean drinking water supply.

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First and foremost, walking our pets on a trail in the forest and not picking up after them (because we don’t think we have to). Guess what? We do have to. Pet droppings are washed into local creeks during heaving rains and land in our reservoirs, contaminating our drinking water. Period. That’s all we need to know. For those who don’t like plastic bags, and I get that, there are long handles pooper shoppers. I spotted a man just the other day with an awesome pooper scooper like the one below. What a simple & easy way to solve a life-threatening problem.

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World Water Day is a gentle reminder of how important clean water is for our survival. And since health is on all of our minds right now, and we’re in the midst of changing so many of our daily routines and habits, let’s rise to the challenge and commit to updating our pet maintenance habits as well. No time like the present. Amazon has just hired 100,000 new employees to process the influx of online orders now that we’re housebound.

Let’s GO!

© Copyright 2018 – 2020. ALL Rights Reserved.
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Protecting Our Water Supply this Spring | Beware of Lawn Fertilizer

Washington (GGM) Analysis | March 8, 2020
NoreenProfilePicHillReport-75 by Noreen Wise

After Trump’s recent roll back of Obama’s Clean Water Act, we have to be more mindful than ever of what we can do as individual citizens to be the stewards of our community water supply in the hopes that we can minimize the negative fallout now that these life-saving federal regulations have been repealed.

I feel traumatized by the horrible news that 60% of our waters will again be unprotected. Climate change has created a seemingly apocalyptic ripple effect from the fallout of the flooding and run off that occurs from the now regular rain bombs, as well as the threat of the new Category 6 hurricanes (not that the National Hurricane Center has officially added Category 6 to the Saffir-Simpson Scale, but recent Hurricane Dorian with winds of 185 mph that flattened the Bahamas, was so far off the charts there’s certainly been a fewa discussions about the need to do so).

Factor in the flooding of superfund sights alone, during this age of climate change, and the frightening consequences for future generations in the calamitous way that water pollutants cause birth defects. This reality is already rattling nerves and alarming homeowners close to these toxic sights. The unseen leaking of life-threatening pollutants  into ground water from buried storage tanks is certainly of grave concern, but all the more troubling is seeing the vacant wastelands flood and the damaging toxic waters flow through town drains as well as the surrounding nearby community property.

Farmland with pesticides and fertilizer is equally as concerning. Weather bombs know no borders. Heavy rains will spread these toxins for miles. They’re usually invisible, but the damage they cause humans is very tangible and physical.

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So with these significant issues now plaguing American communities this spring 2020, and some states stepping in to protect its waters and passing much needed state regulations, we have to do our part too, after all, we’re the ones with the most to lose.

We love beautiful lawns, or course. And we likely use fertilizer to make sure our yards have the right nutrients to nurture our favorite flowers, shrubs and trees. However the ammonium nitrate found in most sterilizers, amongst other hazardous nutrients, are the very pollutants that may cause birth defects after running down the town drains during heavy spring rains.

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Birth defects caused by the nitrates found in fertilizer:

  • spina bifida
  • cleft palate
  • missing limbs

Rules of thumb to avoid contaminating the town water supply?

  • home composting from food scraps that can be added to garden and yard soil
  • many town farmer’s markets now offer free compost
  • organic alternatives that are not water soluble like ammonium nitrate
  • don’t fertilize in the spring, wait until fall when there’s much less rain.

So let’s be more aware, and make a commitment to finding an alternative to fertilizing with heavy nutrients in the spring. We can do this!🌱

 

© Copyright 2018 – 2020. ALL Rights Reserved.
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