Tag: climate injustice

Renewable Portfolio Standard | Solar Energy

Washington (GGM) Analysis | January 3, 2020
NoreenProfilePicHillReport-75 by Noreen Wise

State Renewable Portfolio Standards are often the driver behind how quickly residents switch to solar energy. We all must know where our state stands on critical ST-Saga-CovFrnt-72dpi-300
renewable energy policies that will be the catalyst for how quickly the United States can lower our nation’s carbon footprint. States like Massachusettes, New York, California and Maryland are way out in front, while states like Texas, Florida and Georgia are at the very bottom, and are several of the country’s largest carbon emitters.

Foreign countries are angry about the largest carbon emitter’s lack of movement in reducing carbon levels and have become staunch advocates against climate injustice. On December 20, 2019, a Dutch court  issued a strong warning to world leaders demanding they take climate action to reduce their nation’s carbon footprint or one day be held accountable by victims.

What are Renewable Portfolio Standards?

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According to SolarPower Rocks, an exceptional hub of vital information for anyone seeking details about installing solar panels on home or business roofs or property, Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS) are state laws requiring that utility companies generate a certain percentage of renewable energy by specific dates. For example, Maryland passed a law in 2019 that requires 50% of it’s energy to be renewable by 2030. this is considered aggressive and quite significant. There are now 170 solar companies that have sprung up in Maryland since the law was passed.

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Very exciting to be living in the states that’s a frontrunner. Terrifying to be a resident in a state burying its head in cement, rigidly fixated on the past. This is a matter of life and death.~

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Plastic Update | Marriott Bonvoy Hotels

Washington (GGM) Analysis | September 24, 2019
NoreenProfilePicHillReport-75 by Noreen Wise

With the EU voting to ban single use plastics by 2021, a bold and decisive move, highlighting their focus and commitment to climate action and saving lives, let’s get excited about shifting into high gear and doing the same.

ST-Saga-CovFrnt-72dpi-300The statistics behind single use plastic are alarming:

  • 99% of plastic is made from fossil fuels
  • 40% of plastic production is for single use plastics
  • Global plastic production is the equivalent of “189 500MW coal-fired power stations”

Tiny, impoverished countries around the globe are displaying impressive resourcefulness in replacing single use plastics with a climate crisis alternative. It’s inspiring.

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Marriott Bonvoy Hotels has just announced that by December 2020 it will no longer be offering small individual toiletries to guests, reducing single use plastic by “500 million little plastic bottles per year across the company’s 7,000 hotels in 132 countries.” The bottles are so tiny that they can’t be cleaned, and thus can’t be recycled. Smart. Marriott Bonvoy will instead be using large plastic pumps in the showers. Perfect. I recently stayed at a Marriott and found these to be an excellent Plan B.

Every American company has similar decisions to make. Grocery stores for example will most likely have to go cold turkey on their single use bags. Many consumers are just plain oblivious. After a fifteen year warning, shoppers should not be shocked when they arrive at their favorite store one day and the single use plastic bags have disappeared.

Saying “NO” to single use plastic is very easy. It doesn’t require effort or money, just awareness. Not being mindful of the life or death consequences these types of decisions have on others is irresponsible, some might even say willfully irresponsible. The worst aspect of the climate crisis is climate injustice, where those with the largest carbon footprints (Americans), aren’t necessarily the ones who suffer the most destructive climate consequences. For example, Bahamians have a tiny individual carbon footprint, and yet an entire island was destroyed during Hurricane Dorian, and 1,300 people are still missing and presumed dead. This reality should haunt us, and compel us to act… quickly!

Pivoting away from single use plastic is as simple as the diagram below. It’s just a matter of making different everyday choices. We can do this!

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© Copyright 2018 – 2019. ALL Rights Reserved.
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