Tag: Tesla

Is Elon Musk Mother Nature’s New Price Charming?

Washington (GGM) Analysis | July 23, 2020 by Sarah J. Kings

In March of 2020, Tesla CEO, Elon Musk, announced the search for the perfect location for his newest factory. Not unlike Prince Charming’s country-wide invitation to the castle ball in Cinderella, people far and wide waited in anticipation over Musk’s Choice. July 22nd, a statement was released, saying that the new facility will be built in Austin, Texas.

Twitter- @tedcruz

Unlike other car companies, Tesla far outperformed in earnings despite the global pandemic, reporting four consecutive profitable quarters. This boost for Tesla means a boost for the economy and a major boost for the planet.

Musk announced that the Cybertruck factory will be open to the public. With walking trails, bike paths, a boardwalk, and fish-filled streams, he described the park-like facility as an “ecological paradise.” This new destination will surely bring tourism dollars, but the real economic growth will come from the 5,000 new jobs needed at the site.

The economic buzz surrounding Musk’s latest venture is exciting, but the real news lies in the cars! Tesla promises that from the facility will come four new vehicles, the long-awaited Cyber Truck, the Tesla Semi, the Model Y, and the Model 3. The addition of these new EVs, along with Tesla’s unexpected boost in earnings, means more electric vehicles on the road. Considering the fact that every gallon of gasoline burned creates about 8,887 grams of CO2, this is very big news for Mother Nature!

Tl;dr

  • On July 22nd, 2020, Elon Musk announced that the new Tesla factory will be built in Austin, Texas
  • Tesla far outperformed in earnings, reporting four consecutive profitable quarters
  • The facility will be a park-like destination boasting walking trails, bike paths, a boardwalk, and fish-filled streams
  • The new Tesla factory will create at least 5,000 new jobs 
  • The facility will produce a Cyber Truck, the Tesla Semi, the Model Y, and the Model 3

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Tulsa and Tesla: Newest Battleground in EV Fight

Washington (GGM) Analysis | July 15, 2020 by Erika Browning

In 1901, oil was discovered in Tulsa—the Red Fork area to be exact, which is where my grandfather lives to this day. Within a short five years, Tulsa was declared the “Oil Capital of the World”. This title has been worn proudly by this incredible little city for well over a century. It’s a source of pride that locals have rigs on their land or receive mineral rights for oil supplies.

Beyond Tulsa’s history, its present is also wrapped up in oil. Conoco Phillips is headquartered just a short 45 minutes away in Bartlesville. Oil giants like Waite Phillips, and William Skelly made astronomical amounts of money off the oil that sits underneath the city. When oil prices dip, the effects are felt economically by thousands of Oklahomans. Financial investments depreciate, jobs are on the cutting board, and families worry about paying bills. And that’s just a threat that can be seen coming—let alone when an unforeseen shock to the system occurs. The latter effect was painfully felt when my husband’s company laid off a significant number of its workers during the beginning of the COVID-19 crisis. This is a company that hasn’t had such a layoff in its entire 100 years.

Twitter – @GovStitt

Despite its reliance on oil, Tulsa is also a thriving, progressive city. Citizens are constantly looking for ways to improve the quality of life. I often call Tulsa “my little purple mecca in a desperately red state”. In June 2020, it was announced that Tulsa was in the final running for Elon Musk’s new Tesla truck plant—against Austin, TX. While I do sincerely love the diversity and culture in Austin, Tulsa desperately needs this.

The Tesla Cybertruck Gigafactory would bring in up to 10,000 jobs to a city that deserves to be appreciated. Tulsa offers the romantic pull of Route 66, a diverse populus and a storied history of hard working men and women. There are currently several charging stations for electric vehicles in the Tulsa area, with many more planned as the need arises. With the apparent reversal of our local energy dependence on the horizon, some die-hard oil folk might be resistant to the idea of Tesla being such a prominent fixture in Tulsa. But I assure you, more citizens are in complete support of this move than not.

Twitter – @Tulsa4Tesla

Why can’t oil and renewable energy coexist? Sure, the goal is ultimately to end our dependence on fossil fuels, especially if we have any hope of leaving a sustainable planet for future generations. One thing I have learned about my fellow citizens is this: we are reluctant to change but when given the right guidance and tools, we don’t need to be afraid. It could be just the step we need to kickstart climate change in the right direction in one of the most conservative, oil-dependant states in the US.

Oklahomans aren’t stupid, we are proud. We are a large group of people who have had to adapt for generations. Change may take a bit more time, and we are behind the coastal states, but I believe this could make a great impact in leading to change. I also firmly believe that should the country see such a deep red, oil loving state turn its sights to EVs, it could snowball through to the rest of the red states. ♻️

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Tesla Crushes It In 2019| How Will Other EVs Fair in 2020?

Washington (GGM) Analysis | January 29, 2020
NWHillReport-Pic by Noreen Wise

After a ten year struggle to become profitable, Tesla nailed it in 2019. The 4th quarter was the turning point according to CNN.

Some of the key factors for increased growth in consumer demand that put Tesla into the black are:

  • range
  • how long it takes to charge
  • how many public charging stations exist in local communities
  • and the EV car price

Every single one of these critical factors have moved in the right direction.

  • range increased with the new average at 200 miles per full charge
  • charging time went down significantly and now only averages a quick 20 minutes
  • public charging stations have mushroomed, not only businesses providing them in corporate parking lots to employees, but stores offering charging stations to consumers as a competitive advantage
  • EV car prices have dropped substantially

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Climate action focused states such as New York, California, Connecticut and Massachusetts have crafted creative carrots and stick, incentives and regulations, creating a patchwork of solutions that are driving results. Very happy for Tesla to finally experience the upside of being an innovator, after schlepping through the painful wilderness for so long.

In 2020, Tesla will have to face a much more competitive landscape, now that most of the obstacles in the EV marketplace have been eliminated.

The following is CNET’s Road Show’s official 2020 EV lineup by range:

  • Tesla Model S |373 miles | $79,990
  • Tesla Model 3 | Long Range 330 miles | $44,500
  • Tesla Model X | 328 miles | $81,000
  • Chevrolet Bolt EV | 259 miles | $36,620
  • Hyundai Kona Electric | 258 miles | $36,990
  • Kia Niro EV (SUV) | 239 miles | $38,500
  • Jaguar I-Pace | 234 miles | $69,850
  • Nissan Leaf Plus | 226 miles | $36,550
  • Audi e-tron | 204 miles | $75,000
  • Porsche Taycan | 201 miles | $150,900
  • BMW i3 | 153 miles | $44,450
  • Nissan Leaf | 150 miles | $29,990
  • Mini Cooper SE | 110 miles | $20,000
  • Honda Clarity Electric | 89 miles | lease only

Very extensive options. But the Tesla Model 3 certainly shines amongst its peers.~

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EV Charging Stations | Retail & Restaurant Parking Lots ROCK!

Washington (GGM) Analysis | December 20, 2019
NoreenProfilePicHillReport-75 by Noreen Wise

The new year is here. Thinking of all that can be accomplished on the Climate Action front makes my head spin. Way at the top of the list is EV cars, which means EV charging ST-Saga-CovFrnt-72dpi-300
stations are going to be on everyone’s minds.

Savvy business owners and managers who have parking lots can take advantage of this consumer need by installing a handful of charging stations in their parking lots. It seems that this is what everyone has been talking about at holiday parties this year. Where do you charge your car?

One woman I spoke with lives in a complex that doesn’t yet have charging stations, so she has to be sure to charge in town. She now LOVES Walgreens because they have charging stations. She makes plans to charge while she shops. It was likely that she rarely shopped at Walgreens before buying an EV, but now, it’s her favorite store in the world. And she always spends money, every single week.

HillReport12-20-2019aWide open green fields for marketing, literally. And the best part about this unique opportunity, is that EV owners who charge when visiting a store, feels immense gratitude. The most passionate, heartfelt kind of deep appreciation, almost an indebtedness, the way we feel towards heroes. They’ll likely feel inspired to say “yes” to a  promotion opportunity rather than “no.”

When restaurants and retailers everywhere begin adding charging stations to parking lots, we’ll see EV sales go through the roof, and the atmospheric carbon levels drop. Win/win! In certain regions, businesses can find sizable grants to help cover the cost. Good Luck!~

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